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st: RE: percent format


From   "Nick Cox" <n.j.cox@durham.ac.uk>
To   <statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu>
Subject   st: RE: percent format
Date   Mon, 13 Jun 2005 18:36:12 +0100

I have suggested this as a possibility privately 
to StataCorp, although I have two moods about it. 

In either a graph or a table, I find repeated 
percent symbols to be a constant element that 
should be factored out, as it were, and used 
just once, for example in a row or column heading or 
in an axis title.  

However, it is arguable whether StataCorp 
should play arbiter of elegance (for which 
the historical precedents are not attractive) 
whenever enough users really want something
(although vibratory patterns in graphs are 
banned until the end of time). 

However, I don't know exactly what Jeph means here by 
conversion to string. You can use labels on 
the fly, as in 

... , yla(0 "0%" 10 "10%") ... 

the only problem being the tedium of typing. 

I'll add -prefix()- and -postfix()- options to 
my -mylabels- if I sense enough interest. 

Nick 
n.j.cox@durham.ac.uk 

Jeph Herrin
 
> I often work with percentages, and find it somewhat annoying that
> I have to convert numbers to strings to get them to show up with
> a %-sign. This is particularly a nusiance with graphs, where 
> a histogram
> that might naturally use %s on the y-axis cannot be persuaded
> to do so without generating the frequencies first, relabeling them
> as strings with %s, and then making a two-plot. Is there a trick that
> I don't know about? Is there a reason that Stata avoids, eg, 
> -format %6.1p-?
> Seems like it would be a trivial modification at some level.
> 
> BTW, I use Stata 9, in case it matters.
> 

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