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Re: st: Re: Multiple Imputation (MI)


From   Ricardo Ovaldia <ovaldia@yahoo.com>
To   statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu
Subject   Re: st: Re: Multiple Imputation (MI)
Date   Fri, 13 Jan 2012 09:47:37 -0800 (PST)

The general answer is yes, you can use MI to inpute data. However, you need to be careful when imputing data and may need to consider the sampling scheme and other characteristics regarding how the data was collected.

Ricardo

Ricardo Ovaldia, MS
Statistician 
Oklahoma City, OK


--- On Fri, 1/13/12, john ebireri <jebireri@yahoo.com> wrote:

> From: john ebireri <jebireri@yahoo.com>
> Subject: Re: st: Re: Multiple Imputation (MI)
> To: "statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu" <statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu>
> Date: Friday, January 13, 2012, 11:41 AM
> When i say secondary data i mean data
> that has being previously collected by individuals or an
> institutions. For example, data for the World Bank
> Database.
> 
> Thanks.
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Ricardo Ovaldia <ovaldia@yahoo.com>
> To: statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu
> Cc: 
> Sent: Friday, January 13, 2012 5:35 PM
> Subject: Re: st: Re: Multiple Imputation (MI)
> 
> There are many types of data that can be called secondary
> data, depending on the discipline. For example, secondary
> data may simply be summary data, such as means, SD, medians,
> ect. Is that what you have?
> 
> Please describe your secondary data so that we can answer
> your question regarding MI.
> 
> 
> Ricardo Ovaldia, MS
> Statistician 
> Oklahoma City, OK
> 
> 
> --- On Fri, 1/13/12, john ebireri <jebireri@yahoo.com>
> wrote:
> 
> > From: john ebireri <jebireri@yahoo.com>
> > Subject: st: Re: Multiple Imputation (MI)
> > To: "statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu"
> <statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu>
> > Date: Friday, January 13, 2012, 11:28 AM
> > Dear Statalist Users,
> > 
> > I'm sorry about the initial mix-up.
> > 
> > I know what secondary data is.
> > 
> > I'm actually asking if Multiple Imputation is
> suitable for
> > handling missing observations in secondary data?
> > 
> > John.
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: john ebireri <jebireri@yahoo.com>
> > To: "statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu"
> > <statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu>
> > Cc: 
> > Sent: Friday, January 13, 2012 4:28 PM
> > Subject: Multiple Imputation (MI)
> > 
> > Dear Statalist Users,
> > 
> > I just want to ask if MI is suitable only for primary
> data
> > 
> > I have read a few papers on MI and they keep talking
> about
> > it used for missings in survey data.
> > 
> > Is it suitable for this method (MI) to be used in
> handling
> > missing data in secondary data?
> > 
> > Thanks.
> > 
> > 
> > *
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> > 
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