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Re: st: AW: levelsof problem?


From   joe j <joe.stata@gmail.com>
To   statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu
Subject   Re: st: AW: levelsof problem?
Date   Wed, 28 Jul 2010 21:03:30 +0200

Thanks again , Nick, for your new set of suggestions. Tagging looks
really interesting.

Indeed I should have told you the full story at the outset (I had no
clue when I started this thread that a fuller explanation  was
necessary.)

I'd of course agree with  Clyde that an extended macro from Stata
Corp.  would be of great value.
Joe.

On Wed, Jul 28, 2010 at 6:32 PM, Nick Cox <n.j.cox@durham.ac.uk> wrote:
> What you didn't tell us turns out to be important. (That's a fact, not a criticism.)
>
> Another possibility you might consider is tagging e.g. all EU variables with a characteristic. See help for -char-.
>
> You could do this once and for all with
>
> foreach v of var DE_* NL_* {
>        char def `v'[eu] eu
> }
>
> after which you can things like
>
> ds *_F, has(char eu)
>
> and the subset of names of variables with "eu" characteristic defined will be produced and will be accessible as r(varlist).
>
> With -findname- (SJ) the syntax would be
>
> findname *_F, charname(eu)
>
> and -findname- also allows you to put the list of variable names directly into a local macro. -findname- is my attempt to improve on official -ds-, not quite as hubristic as that might appear.
>
> Of course, the varlist will be longer than DE_* NL_*.
>
> Characteristics are saved with datasets, an important detail.
>

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