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Re: st: RE: OT: your favorite math equations editor


From   Marcello Pagano <Pagano@hsph.harvard.edu>
To   statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu
Subject   Re: st: RE: OT: your favorite math equations editor
Date   Wed, 17 Mar 2004 14:14:32 -0500

If you are going to use PowerPoint or any of the Windows products I would recommend paying an extra few dollars and getting the pro version of MathType:
http://www.dessci.com/en/products/mathtype/

It is every bit as good as TeX (or LaTeX); indeed, it spits out LaTeX code if you want. I have a suspicion that it borrows heavily from TeX--no proof, just a hunch. I notice from the website that it sells for $129 with an academic price of $99. I have been using it for a few years now with very few complaints. (It doesn't reverse colours, for example when you want to print out slides with a dark background.)

If you are not going to use PowerPoint, then go with what Nick says.

m.p.


Nick Cox wrote:


Like quite a lot of people on this list I would generally prefer to use some flavour of TeX (or LaTeX) to prepare text with (or indeed without) much mathematical content. Which implementation and which text editor one uses within (or outside) TeX is largely a matter of taste. I've a bias to text editors with some understanding of TeX, that is, those supporting syntax highlighting for TeX files. These are available
in plenty for Windows OSes.
By "equation editor" you may mean some add-on software designed
to compensate for the inadequacies of word processing
software in this respect. (To be fair, does any word processor claim excellence on this criterion?) I can't comment on those, as I've never used any. However, I know that many people have struggled with the fact that their word processor uses different systems for displayed equations and in-text mathematics, so that even on a simple level it is difficult if not impossible to use
identical fonts. That may be folklore; however, I've never heard of a satisfactory solution to this problem except not using a word processor to prepare mathematical
documents.
Nick n.j.cox@durham.ac.uk
Mary (Merlin) Marshall


I have a collegue who teaches dynamic and thermodynamic meteorology at Ohio State University. His operating system is Micro$oft Win2000 (maybe Win98). He has been thinking about using Powerpoint to teach his classes, but his lectures involve deriving lots of equations and he does not have a good equation editor. This equation editor would also be used to generate equations in research articles for publication in meteorology journals.

So, I have a question for all of you using the Windows operating system who must write a lot of equations in your publications, lectures, etc. What editor would you recommend/what is your favorite editor? If you have experience with more than one equation editor, what were the pluses and minuses of each?

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______________________________________________________________________

Marcello Pagano
Biostatistics Department               Tel: 1-617-432-4911
Harvard School of Public Health        Fax: 1-617-739-1781
655 Huntington Avenue                  email:pagano@biostat.harvard.edu
Boston, MA  02115                      http://biosun1.harvard.edu/~bio200
USA

eppur si muove


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