Statalist The Stata Listserver


[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date index][Thread index]

Re: st: Intro social science stats book


From   "Stas Kolenikov" <skolenik@gmail.com>
To   statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu
Subject   Re: st: Intro social science stats book
Date   Mon, 3 Jul 2006 14:45:59 -0500

On 7/3/06, Friedrich Huebler <huebler@rocketmail.com> wrote:
--- Suzy <scott_788@wowway.com> wrote:
> 2. "Most" established professors that I know use SAS or SPSS, so
> they can't help with Stata questions at all. I've found that the
> "younger" professors actually tend to use R.
I would argue that your sample is too small to make general
statements about the use of Stata.
Unless Suzy comes from the same school where I teach now, I would add
my convenience sample to hers. Stata is pretty much unheard of in
mainstream statistics. We have a STAT 7xxx class on statistical
software that teaches SAS and S-plus/R, as all the medical folks are
using SAS, and all the top-notch statistical research is usually
implemented in R... or at least nobody will call Matlab or Fortran a
purely statistical software. So students see SAS as a must when
applying for industry jobs, and R is necessary to talk to our
professors because the latter use R themselves.

I personally think it is time for Stata Corp. to stop chickening out
of statstics market. Stata has all the programming tools statisticians
find in R (a matrix language, object-oriented tools, compiled code for
faster implementations, even interface with C which, to my memory, was
only used my James Hardin for the suite of measurement error GLMs).
And  the more I work with SAS, the more I like Stata :))

--
Stas Kolenikov
http://stas.kolenikov.name
*
*   For searches and help try:
*   http://www.stata.com/support/faqs/res/findit.html
*   http://www.stata.com/support/statalist/faq
*   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/



© Copyright 1996–2014 StataCorp LP   |   Terms of use   |   Privacy   |   Contact us   |   What's new   |   Site index