Stata 15 help for mf_normal

[M-5] normal() -- Cumulatives, reverse cumulatives, and densities

Syntax

Gaussian normal:

d = normalden(z) d = normalden(x, sd) d = normalden(x, mean, sd) p = normal(z) z = invnormal(p) ln(d) = lnnormalden(z) ln(d) = lnnormalden(x, sd) ln(d) = lnnormalden(x, mean, sd) ln(p) = lnnormal(z)

Binormal:

p = binormal(z1, z2, rho)

Multivariate normal: ln(d) = lnmvnormalden(M, V, X)

Beta:

d = betaden(a, b, x) p = ibeta(a, b, x) q = ibetatail(a, b, x) x = invibeta(a, b, p) x = invibetatail(a, b, q)

Binomial:

pk = binomialp(n, k, pi) p = binomial(n, k, pi) q = binomialtail(n, k, pi) pi = invbinomial(n, k, p) pi = invbinomialtail(n, k, q) Cauchy:

d = cauchyden(a, b, x) p = cauchy(a, b, x) q = cauchytail(a, b, x) x = invcauchy(a, b, p) x = invcauchytail(a, b, q) ln(d) = lncauchyden(a, b, x)

Chi-squared:

d = chi2den(df, x) p = chi2(df, x) q = chi2tail(df, x) x = invchi2(df, p) x = invchi2tail(df, q)

Dunnett's multiple range: p = dunnettprob(k, df, x) x = invdunnettprob(k, df, p)

Exponential:

d = exponentialden(b, x) p = exponential(b, x) q = exponentialtail(b, x) x = invexponential(b, p) x = invexponentialtail(b, q)

F:

d = Fden(df1, df2, f) p = F(df1, df2, f) q = Ftail(df1, df2, f) f = invF(df1, df2, p) f = invFtail(df1, df2, q)

Gamma and inverse gamma:

d = gammaden(a, b, g, x) p = gammap(a, x) q = gammaptail(a, x) x = invgammap(a, p) x = invgammaptail(a, q) dg/da = dgammapda(a, x) dg/dx = dgammapdx(a, x) d2g/da2 = dgammapdada(a, x) d2g/dadx = dgammapdadx(a, x) d2g/dx2 = dgammapdxdx(a, x) ln(d) = lnigammaden(a, b, x)

Hypergeometric:

pk = hypergeometricp(N, K, n, k) p = hypergeometric(N, K, n, k)

Inverse Gaussian:

d = igaussianden(m, a, x) p = igaussian(m, a, x) q = igaussiantail(m, a, x) x = invigaussian(m, a, p) x = invigaussiantail(m, a, q) ln(d) = lnigaussianden(m, a, x) Laplace:

d = laplaceden(m, b, x) p = laplace(m, b, x) q = laplacetail(m, b, x) x = invlaplace(m, b, p) x = invlaplacetail(m, b, q) ln(d) = lnlaplaceden(m, b, x)

Logistic:

d = logisticden(x) d = logisticden(s, x) d = logisticden(m, s, x) p = logistic(x) p = logistic(s, x) p = logistic(m, s, x) q = logistictail(x) q = logistictail(s, x) q = logistictail(m, s, x) x = invlogistic(p) x = invlogistic(s, p) x = invlogistic(m, s, p) x = invlogistictail(q) x = invlogistictail(s, q) x = invlogistictail(m, s, q)

Negative binomial:

pk = nbinomialp(n, k, pi) p = nbinomial(n, k, pi) q = nbinomialtail(n, k, pi) pi = invnbinomial(n, k, p) pi = invnbinomialtail(n, k, q)

Noncentral beta:

d = nbetaden(a, b, np, x) p = nibeta(a, b, np, x) x = invnibeta(a, b, np, p)

Noncentral chi-squared:

d = nchi2den(df, np, x) p = nchi2(df, np, x) q = nchi2tail(df, np, x) x = invnchi2(df, np, p) x = invnchi2tail(df, np, q) np = npnchi2(df, x, p)

Noncentral F:

d = nFden(df1, df2, np, f) p = nF(df1, df2, np, f) q = nFtail(df1, df2, np, f) f = invnF(df1, df2, np, p) f = invnFtail(df1, df2, np, q) np = npnF(df1, df2, f, p)

Noncentral Student's t:

d = ntden(df, np, t) p = nt(df, np, t) q = nttail(df, np, t) t = invnt(df, np, p) t = invnttail(df, np, q) np = npnt(df, t, p)

Poisson:

pk = poissonp(mean, k) p = poisson(mean, k) q = poissontail(mean, k) m = invpoisson(k, p) m = invpoissontail(k, q)

Student's t:

d = tden(df, t) p = t(df, t) q = ttail(df, t) t = invt(df, p) t = invttail(df, q)

Tukey's Studentized range: p = tukeyprob(k, df, x) x = invtukeyprob(k, df, p)

Weibull:

d = weibullden(a, b, x) d = weibullden(a, b, g, x) p = weibull(a, b, x) p = weibull(a, b, g, x) q = weibulltail(a, b, x) q = weibulltail(a, b, g, x) x = invweibull(a, b, p) x = invweibull(a, b, g, p) x = invweibulltail(a, b, q) x = invweibulltail(a, b, g, q)

Weibull (proportional hazards):

d = weibullphden(a, b, x) d = weibullphden(a, b, g, x) p = weibullph(a, b, x) p = weibullph(a, b, g, x) q = weibullphtail(a, b, x) q = weibullphtail(a, b, g, x) x = invweibullph(a, b, p) x = invweibullph(a, b, g, p) x = invweibullphtail(a, b, q) x = invweibullphtail(a, b, g, q)

Wishart and inverse Wishart:

ln(d) = lnwishartden(df, V, X) ln(d) = lniwishartden(df, V, X)

where

1. All functions return real and all arguments are real or real matrices.

2. The left-hand-side notation is used to assist in interpreting the meaning of the returned value:

d = density value pk = probability of discrete outcome K = Pr(K = k) p = left cumulative = Pr(-infinity < statistic < x) (continuous) = Pr(0 < K < k) (discrete) q = right cumulative = 1 - p (continuous) = Pr(K > k) = 1 - p + pk (discrete) np = noncentrality parameter ln(p) = log cumulative ln(d) = log density

3. Hypergeometric distribution:

N = number of objects in the population K = number of objects in the population with the characteristic of interest, K < N n = sample size, n < N k = number of objects in the sample with the characteristic of interest, max(0,n-N+K) < k < min(K,n)

4. Negative binomial distribution: n > 0 and may be nonintegral.

5. Multivariate normal, Wishart, and inverse Wishart distributions:

M = mean vector V = covariance or scale matrix X = random vector or matrix

Description

The above functions return density values, cumulatives, reverse cumulatives, inverse cumulatives, and in one case, derivatives of the indicated probability density function. These functions mirror the Stata functions of the same name and in fact are the Stata functions.

See [FN] Statistical functions for details. In the syntax diagram above, some arguments have been renamed in hope of aiding understanding, but the function arguments match one to one with the underlying Stata functions.

Remarks

Remarks are presented under the following headings:

R-conformability A note concerning invbinomial() and invbinomialtail() A note concerning ibeta() A note concerning gammap()

R-conformability

The above functions are usually used with scalar arguments and then return a scalar result:

: x = chi2(10, 12) : x .7149434997

The arguments may, however, be vectors or matrices. For instance,

: x = chi2((10,11,12), 12) : x 1 2 3 +-------------------------------------------+ 1 | .7149434997 .6363567795 .5543203586 | +-------------------------------------------+

: x = chi2(10, (12,12.5,13)) : x 1 2 3 +-------------------------------------------+ 1 | .7149434997 .7470146767 .7763281832 | +-------------------------------------------+

: x = chi2((10,11,12), (12,12.5,13)) : x 1 2 3 +-------------------------------------------+ 1 | .7149434997 .6727441644 .6309593164 | +-------------------------------------------+

In the last example, the numbers correspond to chi2(10,12), chi2(11,12.5), and chi2(12,13).

Arguments are required to be r-conformable (see [M-6] Glossary), and thus,

: x = chi2((10\11\12), (12,12.5,13)) : x 1 2 3 +-------------------------------------------+ 1 | .7149434997 .7470146767 .7763281832 | 2 | .6363567795 .6727441644 .7066745906 | 3 | .5543203586 .593595966 .6309593164 | +-------------------------------------------+

which corresponds to

1 2 3 +-------------------------------------------+ 1 | chi2(10,12) chi2(10,12.5) chi2(10,13) | 2 | chi2(11,12) chi2(11,12.5) chi2(11,13) | 3 | chi2(12,12) chi2(12,12.5) chi2(12,13) | +-------------------------------------------+

A note concerning invbinomial() and invbinomialtail()

invbinomial(n, k, p) and invbinomialtail(n, k, q) are useful for calculating confidence intervals for pi, the probability of a success. invbinomial() returns the probability pi such that the probability of observing k or fewer successes in n trials is p. invbinomialtail() returns the probability pi such that the probability of observing k or more successes in n trials is q.

A note concerning ibeta()

ibeta(a, b, x) is known as the cumulative beta distribution, and it is known as the incomplete beta function I_x(a, b).

A note concerning gammap()

gammap(a, x) is known as the cumulative gamma distribution, and it is known as the incomplete gamma function P(a, x).

Conformability

All functions require that arguments be r-conformable; see R-conformability above. Returned is matrix of max(argument rows) rows and max(argument columns) columns containing element-by-element calculated results.

Diagnostics

All functions return missing when arguments are out of range.

Source code

Functions are built in.


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