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Re: st: Stata resources for newbie


From   Nick Cox <njcoxstata@gmail.com>
To   Margaret.MacDougall@ed.ac.uk
Subject   Re: st: Stata resources for newbie
Date   Tue, 28 May 2013 12:25:12 +0100

The fix to my prose is here applied within the last sentence of my
previous post in this thread.

[U] is the User's Guide, bundled as .pdf in recent versions of Stata.

> Richard's right, but I am usually surprised that most recommendations
> overlook what is to me the most obvious and the most instructive
> single source.
>
> [U] starts very easy and gets more difficult in a well graded way. But
> Margaret's question seems to imply someone not a beginner in
> statistics, just in Stata, and [U] is ideal for such person. Numerous
> users seem to determined to slow themselves down by Googling
> everything when the richest resource on the language is embedded within
> Stata.

Nick
Nick
njcoxstata@gmail.com


On 28 May 2013 12:22, Margaret MacDougall <Margaret.MacDougall@ed.ac.uk> wrote:
> Many thanks, Nick and Robert, for your valued speedy responses. Yes, I am
> trying to introduce a student of statistics to Stata within the context of a
> summer project, where they will have lots to learn beyond Stata programming.
> Therefore, when using Stata, they need to focus on the exercise of
> translating the types of formulae that arise within the context of
> non-standard hypothesis testing into a language they have not met before. In
> terms of a suitable resource, I expect the keywords are 'systematic' and
> 'focused'.
>
> Nick, in your reply, I understand you as saying that it is "[U]" that is
> "the most obvious and the most instructive single source".  Could you kindly
> confirm what is meant by "[U]". Please excuse me for not knowing.
>
> Best wishes
>
> Margaret
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Dr Margaret MacDougall
> Medical Statistician and Researcher in Education
> Centre for Population Health Sciences
> University of Edinburgh Medical School
> Teviot Place
> Edinburgh EH8 9AG
>
> Tel:  +44 (0) 131 650 3211
> Fax:  +44 (0) 131 650 6909
> E-mail: Margaret.MacDougall@ed.ac.uk
> http://www.chs.med.ed.ac.uk/cphs/people/staffProfile.php?profile=mmacdoug
>
>
> On 27/05/2013 18:49, Nick Cox wrote:
>>
>> Richard's right, but I am usually surprised that most recommendations
>> overlook what is to me the most obvious and the most instructive
>> single source.
>>
>> [U] starts very easy and gets more difficult in a well graded way. But
>> Margaret's question seems to imply someone not a beginner in
>> statistics, just in Stata, and [U] is ideal for such person. Numerous
>> users seem to determined to slow themselves down by Googling
>> everything when the richest resource is bundled on the language within
>> Stata.
>> Nick
>> njcoxstata@gmail.com
>>
>>
>> On 27 May 2013 18:32, Richard Williams<richardwilliams.ndu@gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Numerous freebie resources are listed at
>>>
>>> http://www.stata.com/links/resources-for-learning-stata/
>>>
>>> I myself use the UCLA pages a lot. My own Stata highlights page is at
>>>
>>> http://www3.nd.edu/~rwilliam/stats/StataHighlights.html
>>>
>>> For books, see
>>>
>>> http://www.stata.com/bookstore/books-on-stata/
>>>
>>> The book by Hamilton is the classic and it is what I used when I started.
>>> But several good newer books (e.g. Acock) have come along in recent
>>> years.
>>> Which you prefer might depend on your field of study.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> At 11:02 AM 5/27/2013, Margaret MacDougall wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Hello
>>>>
>>>> I would welcome ideas on useful resources (including textbooks) which
>>>> list
>>>> users have used successfully in helping complete beginners with Stata to
>>>> learn efficiently how to translate formulae and equations from
>>>> theoretical
>>>> statistics into Stata syntax. The new user will be applying  formulae
>>>> within
>>>> the context of hypothesis testing but using modern methods unavailable
>>>> through a point-and-click approach.
>>>>
>>>> Many thanks
>>>>
>>>> Best wishes
>>>>
>>>> Margaret
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
>>>> Scotland, with registration number SC005336.
>>>>
>>>> *
>>>> *   For searches and help try:
>>>> *   http://www.stata.com/help.cgi?search
>>>> *   http://www.stata.com/support/faqs/resources/statalist-faq/
>>>> *   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> -------------------------------------------
>>> Richard Williams, Notre Dame Dept of Sociology
>>> OFFICE: (574)631-6668, (574)631-6463
>>> HOME:   (574)289-5227
>>> EMAIL:  Richard.A.Williams.5@ND.Edu
>>> WWW:    http://www.nd.edu/~rwilliam
>>>
>>>
>>> *
>>> *   For searches and help try:
>>> *   http://www.stata.com/help.cgi?search
>>> *   http://www.stata.com/support/faqs/resources/statalist-faq/
>>> *   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/
>>
>> *
>> *   For searches and help try:
>> *   http://www.stata.com/help.cgi?search
>> *   http://www.stata.com/support/faqs/resources/statalist-faq/
>> *   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/
>>
>
> --
> The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
> Scotland, with registration number SC005336.
>
*
*   For searches and help try:
*   http://www.stata.com/help.cgi?search
*   http://www.stata.com/support/faqs/resources/statalist-faq/
*   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/


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