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Re: st: Stata for thought experiments


From   Nick Cox <njcoxstata@gmail.com>
To   "statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu" <statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu>
Subject   Re: st: Stata for thought experiments
Date   Fri, 24 May 2013 19:25:57 +0100

David is referring to this article
http://www.stata-journal.com/article.html?article=st0281 in Stata
Journal 13(1).  The glory is all the authors'.

Here are the basic details:

Stata as a numerical tool for scientific thought experiments: A
tutorial with worked examples

Theresa Wimberley
Department of Economics and Business
National Centre for Register-Based Research
Aarhus University
Aarhus, Denmark
theresa@ncrr.au.dk

Erik Parner
Department of Public Health
Biostatistics
Aarhus University
Aarhus, Denmark

Henrik Støvring
Department of Public Health
Biostatistics
Aarhus University
Aarhus, Denmark

Abstract.  Thought experiments based on simulation can be used to
explain the impact of the chosen study design, statistical analysis
strategy, or the sensitivity of results to fellow researchers. In this
article, we demonstrate with two examples how to implement
quantitative thought experiments in Stata. The first example uses a
large-sample approach to study the impact on the estimated effect size
of dichotomizing an exposure variable at different values. The second
example uses simulations of datasets of realistic size to illustrate
the necessity of using sampling fractions as inverse probability
weights in statistical analysis for protection against bias in a
complex sampling design. We also give a brief outline of the general
steps needed for implementing quantitative thought experiments in
Stata. We demonstrate how Stata provides programming facilities for
conveniently implementing such thought experiments, with the advantage
of saving researchers time, speculation, and debate as well as
improving communication in interdisciplinary research groups.
Nick
njcoxstata@gmail.com


On 24 May 2013 17:23, Airey, David C <david.airey@vanderbilt.edu> wrote:
> .
>
> The recent article, "Stata as a numerical tool for scientific thought experiments:
> A tutorial with worked examples", was useful and interesting to read.
>
> Thanks to the authors and editors.
>
>
>
>
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