Bookmark and Share

Notice: On March 31, it was announced that Statalist is moving from an email list to a forum. The old list will shut down at the end of May, and its replacement, statalist.org is already up and running.


[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: st: MANOVA to verify difference (Away)


From   "Seyi Soremekun" <Seyi.Soremekun@lshtm.ac.uk>
To   <statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu>
Subject   Re: st: MANOVA to verify difference (Away)
Date   Thu, 22 Sep 2011 00:01:05 +0100

I am away from the 21st September until the 12th October. Please direct any urgent enquiries to Linda Vesel (linda.vesel@lshtm.ac.uk).
Seyi

>>> Damiano Bordogna <damiano.bordogna@gmail.com> 09/22/11 00:00 >>>

Dear Cameron,

here are my answers to your questions:
1) The groups of stakeholders are from different firms ( in ex. i've 2
CEO from the firm A, 1 CEO from B, 2 from C, 1 External Manager from
A, 3 from E etc...)
2) Yes, if the stakeholder chose the objective, its value is 1
3) Both: i mean differences in the counts/percentage of people holding
the objective across groups, but i would also like to see if the
chosen objectives are related to differences on some other variable
(the "salience" variable)
4) Stakeholder salience underlines the importance of the stakeholder
in the firm decisional process. For example, a simple employee has a
low level of salience, while a manager has an high level. Salience is
influenced by experience, ownage of the firm, prestige, structural
power etc..
5) No: i'm building theory from case study (surveys). So i'm trying to
analize my data searching for something interesting. My hypotesis is
that the choose of an objective instead of another one is influenced
by the interviewee's role as well as his salience (which is influenced
by the role).

Role --------------------> Objectives
  |__ Salience________|

Thank you again Cameron!
Have a nice day

Damiano

2011/9/21 Cameron McIntosh <cnm100@hotmail.com>:
> Damiano,
> From what you say, I'm not sure that MANOVA is the optimal approach, but I think there still isn't enough information to give the best advice. So, let's be more precise:
> 1. Are the six groups stakeholders from six different firms, or from one firm but divided along some other qualitative aspect? Either way, your sample size is going to be on low side.2. As for the 11 dummies, are these just 0=holds the objective; 1=doesn't hold the objective?3. When you say, "differences according to chosen objectives", do you just mean differences in the counts/percentage of people holding the objective across groups, or are the chosen objectives supposedly related to differences on some other variable?4. What do you mean by "stakeholder salience"? What role are these variables supposed to play?5. Similar to question 4: Do you have some kind of guiding theory and specific hypotheses? If so, What are they?
> Thanks,
> Cam
>
> ----------------------------------------
>> Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2011 18:18:13 +0200
>> Subject: Re: st: MANOVA to verify difference
>> From: damiano.bordogna@gmail.com
>> To: statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu
>>
>> Thank you Ronan,
>>
>> i'll try to introduce you my problem!
>>
>> My database is made of
>> - 57 observation (divided into 6 groups of respondant), representing
>> firm's stakeholders (iROWS)
>> - 11 binary variables, representing stakeholders' objectives (COL)
>> - 4 normal (not descrete) variables, representing stakeholders' salience (COL)
>>
>> I want to verify if there are differences between the different groups
>> according to the choosed objectives (VERY IMPORTANT: as said before,
>> objectives are dummy variables, 0-1).
>>
>> Thank you again Ronan!
>>
>> 2011/9/21 Ronan Conroy <rconroy@rcsi.ie>:
>> > On 2011 MFómh 21, at 14:36, Damiano Bordogna wrote:
>> >
>> >> Is it possible, with MANOVA, to verify if there's some kind of
>> >> difference between different goups of observation?
>> >
>> > That is the kind of question that doesn't get you very far. Can you explain what you are trying to do?
>> >
>> > Many statistical procedures examine difference of some kind between groups of observations. And no statistical procedure can verify that there is a difference. All you can do is see how well the observed differences are explained by chance, and, more important, see if the observed effect sizes are of any real life importance.
>> >
>> > Tell us a little more about your problem, then!
>> >
>> >
>> > Ronán Conroy
>> > rconroy@rcsi.ie
>> > Associate Professor
>> > Division of Population Health Sciences
>> > Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
>> > Beaux Lane House
>> > Dublin 2
>> >
>> >
>> > *
>> > *   For searches and help try:
>> > *   http://www.stata.com/help.cgi?search
>> > *   http://www.stata.com/support/statalist/faq
>> > *   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/
>> >
>>
>> *
>> * For searches and help try:
>> * http://www.stata.com/help.cgi?search
>> * http://www.stata.com/support/statalist/faq
>> * http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/
>
> *
> *   For searches and help try:
> *   http://www.stata.com/help.cgi?search
> *   http://www.stata.com/support/statalist/faq
> *   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/
>

*
*   For searches and help try:
*   http://www.stata.com/help.cgi?search
*   http://www.stata.com/support/statalist/faq
*   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/


*
*   For searches and help try:
*   http://www.stata.com/help.cgi?search
*   http://www.stata.com/support/statalist/faq
*   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/


© Copyright 1996–2014 StataCorp LP   |   Terms of use   |   Privacy   |   Contact us   |   Site index