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Re: st: looking for more efficient programming for randomly shuffling list of numbers


From   Steve Samuels <sjsamuels@gmail.com>
To   statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu
Subject   Re: st: looking for more efficient programming for randomly shuffling list of numbers
Date   Fri, 27 Aug 2010 10:09:12 -0400

Evelyn-
I misunderstood: I thought each "sticker" was to hold a single number.
 I like the idea.

Steve

On Fri, Aug 27, 2010 at 5:37 AM, Evelyn Ersanilli
<evelyn.ersanilli@qeh.ox.ac.uk> wrote:
> Thank you all for these wonderful suggestions!
>
> @Steve
> The idea is that first all household members are listed in the household grid. Then the interviewer will cross off the numbers on the stickers until s/he finds and number (= HHmember ID) that refers to an eligible HH member.
> Let's say there are 20 HH members, with three eligible (ID numbers 2, 6 and 17).
> If the sticker looks like
> 8 - 5 - 17 - 4 - 2 - 19 - 12 - 7 - 1 - 20 - 18 - 3 - 16 - 15 - 6 - 9 - 13 - 11 - 10 - 14
> The randomly selected person in this case has ID 17
> It is a method that has been used by the Worldbank in their LSMS studies.
> I am aware of other methods such as the Kish grid, and first/last birthday methods, but these all have their disadvantages as well, especially in the developing and transit country context that we will do the interviews in.
>
> Kind regards
>
> Evelyn
>
> RE: st: looking for more efficient programming for randomly shuffling list of numbers
> ________________________________________
> From
>   Nick Cox <n.j.cox@durham.ac.uk>
> To
>   "'statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu'" <statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu>
> Subject
>   RE: st: looking for more efficient programming for randomly shuffling list of numbers
> Date
>   Fri, 27 Aug 2010 09:46:42 +0100
> ________________________________________
> A very minor point, but -ceil(20* runiform())- is also a nice way to get uniform integers 1 ... 20 (for "any value of 20").
>
> Yet another posthumous nod to Kenneth E. Iverson, who came up with the names floor and ceiling for the round up and down functions yielding integer results.
>
> Nick
> n.j.cox@durham.ac.uk
>
> Jeph Herrin
>
> How about
>
> **************
>  clear all
>  set obs 9600
>  set seed 85999283
>  gen str60 sticker=""
>  gen num=.
>  forv i=1/20 {
>        replace num=floor(20*uniform())+1
>        replace sticker=sticker+" "+string(num)
>  }
>  drop num
> **************
>
> ?
>
>
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