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Re: st: All coefficients significant


From   "Michael I. Lichter" <mlichter@buffalo.edu>
To   statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu
Subject   Re: st: All coefficients significant
Date   Thu, 24 Jun 2010 11:49:19 -0400

Rosie,

Without seeing output and getting some background, I can't suggest anything further.

-ml

Rosie Chen wrote:
Thanks, Michael. This is a friend's problem, and he asked me to post it here. I don't have his data, but I have requested his output and found that the sample size is huge, indicating that he might have used the wrong weight. This might explain the all significant findings. The degree of freedom is 1 for all variables, which is weird to me. He has about two thousands cases and twenty predictors, and the outcome is a binary variable. Any thought on this? Thank you,

Rosie



----- Original Message ----
From: Michael I. Lichter <mlichter@buffalo.edu>
To: statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu
Sent: Wed, June 23, 2010 1:59:13 PM
Subject: Re: st: All coefficients significant

Rosie,

If you have a very large sample size, you may get results that are statistically significant despite being of little practical significance. If you are erroneously using very large f-weights, you could get the same result. For a better answer than that, you will have to supply more information. Show us your regression results and provide a little background about the variables and why you think it substantively unlikely that all of the coefficients would be significant.

Michael

Rosie Chen wrote:
Does anyone know what could have gone wrong with the following situation? A regression analysis produced the coefficients that are statistically significant at .001 level. This is unusual to me. What could have caused such a problem? Many thanks for any advice. Rosie



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-- Michael I. Lichter, Ph.D. <mlichter@buffalo.edu>
Research Assistant Professor & NRSA Fellow
UB Department of Family Medicine / Primary Care Research Institute
UB Clinical Center, 462 Grider Street, Buffalo, NY 14215
Office: CC 126 / Phone: 716-898-4751 / FAX: 716-898-3536

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--
Michael I. Lichter, Ph.D. <mlichter@buffalo.edu>
Research Assistant Professor & NRSA Fellow
UB Department of Family Medicine / Primary Care Research Institute
UB Clinical Center, 462 Grider Street, Buffalo, NY 14215
Office: CC 126 / Phone: 716-898-4751 / FAX: 716-898-3536

*
*   For searches and help try:
*   http://www.stata.com/help.cgi?search
*   http://www.stata.com/support/statalist/faq
*   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/


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