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Re: st: texdoc


From   Michael Norman Mitchell <Michael.Norman.Mitchell@gmail.com>
To   statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu
Subject   Re: st: texdoc
Date   Mon, 17 May 2010 19:34:24 -0700

Dear Nick, Austin, Phil, Dave

  Thank you all for your thoughts on this... I appreciate it very much!!

Unfortunately, I am in the situation of not only trying to save Stata output/graphs as a word document myself, but coming up with a solution that will work for our entire group of Stata users, which includes quite a mixture of technical levels. While these solutions are very clever, I fret they are too intricate for our user base. This is especially the case for those who also use SPSS and will ask me why they cannot just -save as a word document (RTF)- in one step as they can do in SPSS.

Many thanks!

Michael N. Mitchell
See the Stata tidbit of the week at...
http://www.MichaelNormanMitchell.com

On 2010-05-17 12.03 PM, Phil Schumm wrote:
On May 17, 2010, at 1:16 PM, Michael Norman Mitchell wrote:
Thanks for posting this to bring this to our (and my) attention. I always believe very strongly in using this kind of "weaving" approach and find it very efficient. Are you (or is anyone on the Statalist) aware of a tool similar to this that weaves comments, commands, output, and graphs into a Word document? At my work, we are in constant need of creating such integrated outputs and the standard format is a Word document.


I'm afraid your options here are going to be a lot more restricted if your target format is Word, since the people who have worked on this problem have tended to prefer LaTeX-based approaches or similar. The one MS Office-based product I'm aware of for doing reproducible research is inference, from Blue Reference (http://inference.us/). Unfortunately, I don't believe they currently support Stata (I could be wrong here, since I haven't looked at this in a while). I don't use Word myself, so there may be other MS Office-based options of which I am unaware. One could certainly write something that would work with Office (as inference demonstrates), however you'd have to use VSTO and you'd be stuck with MS's upgrade cycles.

Another alternative is to use one of the other tools for reproducible research (e.g., StatWeave) and then translate the final product into Word. This is the strategy I tend to favor when I have to deliver a final product in Word format, and there are several options here (though none of them is perfect). For example, you can translate from LaTeX to RTF using latex2rtf, and then open the RTF file in Word (this is what I normally use). Another option is to use TeX4ht to translate from LaTeX into Open Office, and then use Open Office to save the file(s) in Word format. There may be better tool-chains for doing this out there -- I just don't do it often enough to go looking.

Ideally, you'd get people to covert to PDF as the target format (after all, you can work with PDFs on all platforms), and then you'd be in better shape.


-- Phil

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