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Re: st: RE: Descriptives using multiple-imputed complex survey design data


From   Rosie Chen <jiarongchen2002@yahoo.com>
To   statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu
Subject   Re: st: RE: Descriptives using multiple-imputed complex survey design data
Date   Fri, 26 Feb 2010 16:43:12 -0800 (PST)

Thank you, Steve. Yes, I think I will present weighted means and proportions in the descriptive tables. Thanks again to all the thoughtful help!

Rosie




----- Original Message ----
From: "sjsamuels@gmail.com" <sjsamuels@gmail.com>
To: statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu
Sent: Thu, February 25, 2010 9:55:05 AM
Subject: Re: st: RE: Descriptives using multiple-imputed complex survey design  data

" In that  case, there is no reason to describe the population."

This was too strong.  In a study to test means and proportions, for
example, I will certainly display population estimates in important
subgroups.

-Steve

On Wed, Feb 24, 2010 at 4:33 PM,  <sjsamuels@gmail.com> wrote:
> Rosie asked:  ..."is it a common practice to do descriptive analysis
> (mean, proportion, cross-tabs) using all design features, including
> weight, strata, and cluster variables?  I had assumed that it
> is....But then do people use the descriptive statistics to make
> inference to the population?"
>
>
> It depends on the purpose of your study.  For most studies, I describe
> the *sample* as is, so that people can see the n's.   If the purpose
> of the study is describe the population, then I also use -tab- -mean-
> -prop- survey commands with full features.. But frequently, the
> purpose is analytic (regression, testing associations) and much is
> known about the population (from a census, for example).  In that
> case, there is no reason to describe the population.
>
> I suggest that you read a good introductory survey text, for example
> Sharon Lohr's Sampling: Design and Analysis.
>



-- 
Steven Samuels
sjsamuels@gmail.com
18 Cantine's Island
Saugerties NY 12477
USA
845-246-0774

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