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Re: st: RE: Complex Medical Data


From   Tom Trikalinos <ttrikalin@gmail.com>
To   statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu
Subject   Re: st: RE: Complex Medical Data
Date   Sat, 14 Feb 2009 16:01:38 -0500

TA, see

help reshape wide

in reshaping, j will be your drug

hth,

TAT


On Sat, Feb 14, 2009 at 12:22 AM, TA Stat <tastat@gmail.com> wrote:
> For example, from table 1 to table 2, create a variable name "GMMT"
> with the conditions explain earlier.  John received GMMT for visit 1,
> visit 2, visit 4, but not visit 3.  Jen received GMMT at visit 1,
> visit 2, visit 4, but not visit 3.
>
> Although at visit 4 for Jen, a combination of A4 and B3 is not GMMT,
> but she also received C4. So she received GMMT.  At visit 3 for John,
> he received C1 and D1 (any combination of drug from Class C and Class
> D), so he received GMMT.
>
> I want to know how to get Table 2 from Table 1.
>
> ***************************************************************************************
>
> Table 1
>
> Name       Visit      Drug
>
> John           1           A1
> John           1           B1
> John           1           C1
> John           2           A1
> John           2           B1
> John           3           C1
> John           3           D1
> John           4           B2
> John           4           C2
> John           4           D1
> Jen             1           B3
> Jen             1           C3
> Jen             1           D4
> Jen             2           A4
> Jen             2           B3
> Jen             2           C3
> Jen             2           D4
> Jen             3           A4
> Jen             3           B3
> Jen             4           A4
> Jen             4           B3
> Jen             4           C4
>
> ***************************************************************************************
>
> Table 2
>
> Name       Visit      Drug        GMMT (Y=Yes, N=No)
>
> John           1           A1            Y
> John           1           B1            Y
> John           1           C1            Y
> John           2           A1            Y
> John           2           B1            Y
> John           3           C1            N
> John           3           D1            N
> John           4           B2            Y
> John           4           C2            Y
> John           4           D1            Y
> Jen             1           B3            Y
> Jen             1           C3            Y
> Jen             1           D4            Y
> Jen             2           A4            Y
> Jen             2           B3            Y
> Jen             2           C3            Y
> Jen             2           D4            Y
> Jen             3           A4            N
> Jen             3           B3            N
> Jen             4           A4            Y
> Jen             4           B3            Y
> Jen             4           C4            Y
>
>
> ***************************************************************************************
>
> Table 3
>
> Name       Visit      Drug        GMMT (Y=Yes, N=No)
>
> John           1           A1            Y
> John           2           A1            Y
> John           3           C1            N
> John           4           B2            Y
> Jen             1           B3            Y
> Jen             2           A4            Y
> Jen             3           A4            N
> Jen             4           A4            Y
>
>
> On Sat, Feb 14, 2009 at 2:29 AM, Nick Cox <n.j.cox@durham.ac.uk> wrote:
>> <>
>>
>> An example of data would help make this clearer.
>>
>> Nick
>> n.j.cox@durham.ac.uk
>>
>> TA Stat
>>
>> I have data arranged in the format that each row represents one drug
>> for clinic visit. So, one patient may have more than one drug (row)
>> for each visit. Each patient also have several clinic visits.
>>
>> There are 4 classes of drugs, called Class A, Class B, Class C and
>> Class D. Class A has four drugs, called A1, A2, A3 and A4. Class B has
>> 3 drugs, called B1, B2, B3. so as Class C and Class D (as presented
>> below). Some combination of drugs is called GMMT, other is not. I
>> would like to find if each patient has received GMMT at each clinic
>> visit or not. Basically, I want to identify whether patient receive
>> GMMT for each visit or not.
>>
>> Class A: A1, A2, A3, A4
>>
>> Class B: B1, B2, B3
>>
>> Class C: C1, C2, C3
>>
>> Class D: D1, D2, D3, D4
>>
>> a combination of drug is called GMMT if
>>
>> Class A and Class B
>>
>> Class A and Class C
>>
>> Class A and Class D
>>
>> Class B and Class C
>>
>> Class A and Class B and Class C
>>
>> (However, there are some exception)
>>
>> but not for Class C and Class D
>>
>> but not for A4 and B3
>>
>>
>> *
>> *   For searches and help try:
>> *   http://www.stata.com/help.cgi?search
>> *   http://www.stata.com/support/statalist/faq
>> *   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/
>>
> *
> *   For searches and help try:
> *   http://www.stata.com/help.cgi?search
> *   http://www.stata.com/support/statalist/faq
> *   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/
>
*
*   For searches and help try:
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*   http://www.stata.com/support/statalist/faq
*   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/



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