Statalist


[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date index][Thread index]

Re: st: Matching in STATA


From   "Salah Mahmud" <salah.mahmud@gmail.com>
To   statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu
Subject   Re: st: Matching in STATA
Date   Sun, 22 Jun 2008 20:25:53 -0600

Hi Henry,

As has been suggested before, I'm not sure that matching in the
setting of pre-collected data is worth the trouble unless you intend
to go back and collect more data on the sampled subset.

The way I see it, matching, when employed during the design phase,
permits control for important confounders while maximizing study
power. Another use for matching is as a way for adjusting for
confounders that are difficult to characterize and quantify (eg
confouding by genetic makeup or neighbourhood). Neither scenarios seem
to apply here but I could be missing something.

Best wishes,

salah mahmud



On 6/22/08, Henry <jakanyada@gmail.com> wrote:
> Many thanks for your suggestions, which will help me a great deal.
> Svend, I am using a longitudinal primary care data extracted by Dec 2002.
> A case-control study design has been used to identify an association
> between an outcome (event) and an exposure.  I would like to control
> for potential confounders (age and sex) and thus matching on these
> variables.
> A 2x2 table is my interest to obtain the Odds ratios. This should give
> me the concordant and discordant pairs once the matching is done.
> Conditional logistic regression will definitely be the way forward for
> our analysis.
> My problem can be solved by what listers suggested of using dummy
> variables and then matching on age-groups excluding already matched
> cases.
> I guess this can be possible even when we extend to the 1:n matching
> (though still not sure till I try it out)
> Another important variable to introduce will be pair-ID for matched pairs.
> I had looked at what Maarten suggested but wasn't sure how to
> implement the packages and was also reluctant on the –sttocc- given
> nature of my data but with the suggestions; I can have a second look.
>
> *************************************************************************************************************************************************
> Dear Henry,
> Guess I would generate a new dummy variable (for both data sets) for
> the case where you want to merge by age-groups and then merge by this
> new age-group.
> Kind regards,
> Andrea
> *************************************************************
> There are now quite a lot of packages available in this area, see:
> -findit match treatment- (and try some other searches with -findit-)
> -- Maarten
> *************************************************************
> I get the impression that data have already been collected, and that
> the purpose of matching is to facilitate analysis (at the cost of
> dropping some of the control observations). Actually, matching
> complicates rather than facilitates analysis in case-control studies;
> at least you need to use conditional logistic regression (or -mcc-) to
> analyse correctly. So, if my impression is right, the recommendation
> is to analyse with -logistic- (or -cc-) including the potential
> confounders of interest, but avoiding to match and to remove any of
> the control observations. A variable like age could be grouped, e.g.,
> in five-year groups.
> Anyway, if you want or need to match, the usual way is to categorize
> a variable in, e.g., five year groups: 30-34, 35-39, etc. This is
> more handy, and it also facilitates reporting the results (you can
> stratify by age group).
> Hope this helps
> Svend
> **************************************************************
> On Fri, Jun 20, 2008 at 3:48 PM, Salah Mahmud <salah.mahmud@gmail.com> wrote:
> > For completeness, also see    [ST] sttocc -- Convert survival-time
> > data to case-control data
> >
> > sttocc automates the process of sampling matched controls. It is
> > intended to generate nested case-control data from a cohort data but
> > it should not be difficult to "fool" it into sampling from a
> > cross-sectional data.
> >
> > You still need to create the grouped age variable as per above posts.
> >
> > In my experience, you will require several rounds of matching with
> > increasingly permissive age grouping to find matches to all your cases
> > unless you have lots of data and only 1 or 2 matching variables. This
> > could be implemented within a for loop where each successive loop
> > drops and then creates an age grouping variable that is slightly
> > cruder than its predecessor.
> >
> > For instance,
> > round                    age group variable
> > 1                           agegroup = age  ("exact" matching)
> > 2                           agegroup = age collapsed into 2 yrs intervals
> > 3                           agegroup = age collapsed into 3 yrs
> > intervals and so,
> >
> > Of course, you will need to exclude any matched cases (and perhaps
> > controls) before merging the ummatched cases to the remaining
> > controls.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > On Fri, Jun 20, 2008 at 6:25 AM, Svend Juul <SJ@soci.au.dk> wrote:
> >>
> >> Henry wrote:
> >>
> >> I would like to carry out some matching for a case-control study using
> >> STATA but its proving to be a bit challenging to me. I have checked
> >> from achieves but a query close to mine on statlist was not answered
> >> in 2004. Could there be a way of matching cases to controls within a
> >> range of values say for age, a 40yr old case-patient can be matched to
> >> either a 38 or 39 or 40 or 41 or 42yr old control-patient? I have used
> >> the -merge- command to merge two datasets by sex and age of patients
> >> but it only works for 40yr old case matching a 40yr old control. For
> >> this case am still interested in a 1-1  matching but what if I extend
> >> this to a 1:n match?  I want to have something of this sort:
> >>
> >> case-patient  case-age  sex  control-patient  control-age
> >>        00b7        35    1             00YP           35
> >>        00b7        35    1             0XC1           33
> >>        00b7        35    1             0001           36
> >>
> >> ==================================================================
> >>
> >> I get the impression that data have already been collected, and that
> >> the purpose of matching is to facilitate analysis (at the cost of
> >> dropping some of the control observations). Actually, matching
> >> complicates rather than facilitates analysis in case-control studies;
> >> at least you need to use conditional logistic regression (or -mcc-) to
> >> analyse correctly. So, if my impression is right, the recommendation
> >> is to analyse with -logistic- (or -cc-) including the potential
> >> confounders of interest, but avoiding to match and to remove any of
> >> the control observations. A variable like age could be grouped, e.g.,
> >> in five-year groups.
> >>
> >> Anyway, if you want or need to match, the usual way is to categorize
> >> a variable in, e.g., five year groups: 30-34, 35-39, etc. This is
> >> more handy, and it also facilitates reporting the results (you can
> >> stratify by age group).
> >>
> >> Hope this helps
> >> Svend
> >>
> >>
> >> __________________________________________
> >>
> >> Svend Juul
> >> Institut for Folkesundhed, Afdeling for Epidemiologi
> >> (Institute of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology)
> >> Vennelyst Boulevard 6
> >> DK-8000  Aarhus C, Denmark
> >> Phone:  +45 8942 6090
> >> Home:   +45 8693 7796
> >> Email:  sj@soci.au.dk
> >> __________________________________________
> >>
> >> *
> >> *   For searches and help try:
> >> *   http://www.stata.com/support/faqs/res/findit.html
> >> *   http://www.stata.com/support/statalist/faq
> >> *   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/
> >>
> > *
> > *   For searches and help try:
> > *   http://www.stata.com/support/faqs/res/findit.html
> > *   http://www.stata.com/support/statalist/faq
> > *   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/
> >
>
> *
> *   For searches and help try:
> *   http://www.stata.com/support/faqs/res/findit.html
> *   http://www.stata.com/support/statalist/faq
> *   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/
>

*
*   For searches and help try:
*   http://www.stata.com/support/faqs/res/findit.html
*   http://www.stata.com/support/statalist/faq
*   http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/stata/



© Copyright 1996–2014 StataCorp LP   |   Terms of use   |   Privacy   |   Contact us   |   What's new   |   Site index