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Perhaps we can make some progress. 

First, we can get averages of ages for each person with 
the same S_id in each household. These are all 

either wives of the same husband, 

or the husband of at least one wife, 

presumably, irrespective of any arbitrariness in who got what 
S_id. 

bysort hhold S_id : egen meanS_age = mean(S_age) 

Now we generate the number of spouses with the 
same S_id: 

by hhold S_id : egen nS = count(S_id) if S_id < . 

nS is 1 for each husband (each wife belongs 
to just one husband, so the S_id pertaining to
the wife will occur just once) 

nS is 1 or more for each wife  

nS is . for unmarried members 

Sort within -hhold- so that the husbands always get
put first whenever there is more than one wife, and then we can 
look at the observation above or below as needed: 

bysort hhold (nS) : gen S_age = meanS_age[3 - _n] 

That is, within each -hhold- with 2 or more 
wives the husband has been sorted first. 
For him _n is 1 and 3 - _n is 2. 
And, within such -hhold-s, the wives come next. 
For whoever is first of them _n is 2 and 3 - _n is 1. 

Even if there is just one husband and one wife,
this will still be valid. The husband and wife
are still the first two observations within 
each -hhold- and the appropriate S_age is just
obtained by looking up or down as needed. 

However, apart from any mistakes here, 
this all assumes at most one married man
in each -hhold-. Now tell me... 

Nick 
n.j.cox@durham.ac.uk 

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